Par Mariam Barry

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Connu depuis l’antiquité, l’esclavage consistait à priver un individu de sa liberté, elle fonctionnait donc que sous la contrainte, la violence et réduisait les victimes au rang de marchandise négociable.

L’Organisation Internationale du Travail (OIT), estime que l’esclavage contemporain touche aujourd’hui plus de 40 millions de personnes à travers le monde. Et plus de 70% des victimes sont des femmes, le plus souvent en Afrique subsaharienne, à travers les exploitations sexuelles, les mariages forcés et précoces.

One of the world’s most comprehensive and progressive women’s human rights instruments, the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights of Women in Africa (the Maputo Protocol) was adopted by Heads of State and Government in Maputo, Mozambique, 19 years ago today - on 11 July 2003.

Two of Make Every Woman Count's Research Fellow's reflect on this milestone: 

By Grace Pattison

CEDAW: To fight against or collaborate with culture?

There are many definitions and aspects of culture; Kroeber and Kluchhohn synthesised these to form a useful, overall definition: “Culture consists of patterns, explicit and implicit, of an for behaviour acquired and transmitted by symbols, constituting the distinctive achievements of human groups, including their embodiments in artifacts; the essential core of culture consists of tradition (i.e., historically derived and selected) ideas and especially their attached values; culture systems may, on the one hand, be considered as products of action, on the other as condition elements of further action.”

By: Natalie Czarnota

Widows are often thought of as elderly women, but many women are widowed at young ages too. One in 10 African women over 15 years of age are widows. This number is significant because when a woman’s husband dies, she faces danger in many African communities. Widows face discriminatory and harmful treatment perpetrated by the community. Many of the practices involving widows are classified as inhuman, humiliating and degrading.

By Becky Zelikson

"You can't leave politics out of it. Being a lesbian, being a woman, is politics"

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